Philip Birget

Philip Birget

PhD student

Ph. +44 131 650 8642
philipbirget@gmail.com 

or P.L.G.Birget@sms.ed.ac.uk

I am investigating parasite strategies for survival and reproduction, especially focusing on the trade-offs that malaria parasites experience between both. I shall be creating models of the process topped with delicious experimentally obtained rodent insights and insides.

The study of Plasmodium & Co has shaped a large part of my active research career. Inspired by the infectious cycle of malaria, I started with studies on hosts (Bachelor’s Project), moved on to mosquitoes (Master's Thesis) and have ended up working on the parasite (PhD).

In the past, I Ramboed my way through the Peruvian cloud forest to look at altitudinal gradients of malaria infections in tropical birds. I chased house sparrows in the boggy Camargue of South of France to see which effects avian malaria parasites have on the sexiness of males. During my master’s thesis, reason took over and activating my dormant mathematical brain, I constructed models of how insecticide-treated bed nets influence malaria transmission and affect mosquito genetics in terms of insecticide-resistance evolution. For my PhD I am investigating parasite strategies of survival and reproduction, especially focusing on the trade-offs between in-host replication and between-host transmission. 

Furthermore I am interested in ecology and evolution in its broadest sense. I am fascinated by gut bacterial systems and as a qualified Luxembourgish bird ringer and trainer, I contribute to generating and analysing terabites of migration ecology data of my home ringing station (http://lb.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schlammwiss).

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Publications

Birget, P. L., Repton, C., O'Donnell, A. J., Schneider, P., & Reece, S. E. (2017) Phenotypic plasticity in reproductive effort: malaria parasites respond to resource availability Proc. R. Soc. B (Vol. 284, No. 1860, p. 20171229)

Birget, P. L.G., Greischar, M., Reece, S. E. and Mideo, N. (2017) Altered life-history strategies protect malaria parasites against drugs Evol Appl. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1111/eva.12516

Birget PLG and Larcombe SD. Maternal effects, malaria infections and the badge size of the house sparrow. Avian Research, 2015, 6:22, DOI: 10.1186/s40657-015-0029-7

Birget PLG, Koella JC (2015) An Epidemiological Model of the Effects of Insecticide-Treated Bed Nets on Malaria Transmission. PLoS ONE 10(12): e0144173. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0144173

Birget PLG, Koella JC (2015) A genetic model of the effects of insecticide-treated bed nets on the evolution of insecticide-resistance. EMPH 2015, doi:10.1093/emph/eov019

Birget PLG Breeding birds of Uebersyren: Estimation of population sizes from 2001 to 2012. Regulus Wissenschaftliche Berichte, No 28, 2013

Birget PLG Phenological Time-Series of Bird Migration: Eleven Years of Monitoring at a Site in Luxembourg. Regulus Wissenschaftliche Beriche, No 28, 2013

Birget PLG Biodiversity dynamics at a migration stopover site in Central-Europe : Ecological relevance and implications for conservation. Regulus Wissenschaftliche Berichte, No 26, 2011

Education

2013 - present
FNR (Fond national de la Recherche) -funded PhD fellowship, University of Edinburgh

2012-2013
Msc in Quantitative Biology, Imperial College London

2009-2012
BA Biological Sciences, University of Oxford (St Peter’s College)

2008-2009
University of St Andrews

2001-2008
Lycée de Garçons Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg